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Small Ruminant/Camelid Services – Foothills Mobile Veterinary Service PLLC

Small Ruminant/Camelid Services

  • VaccinationsP1180168
  • Strategic deworming and fecal egg counts
  • Dystocia management
  • Castrations
  • Nutrition consultation
  • Foot trimming
  • Certificates of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificates)
  • Regulatory testing (Tuberculosis, Brucellosis, etc)

Sheep/Goat Resources:

Vaccinations:

  • Clostridial Perfringens Types C and D with Tetanus (CD/T) should be given by subcutaneous injection at 3 months of age, boostered 3-4 weeks later, then given once annually. Adult animals should receive this vaccine once annually.
  • Rabies should be given at 3 months of age, then repeated annually.

Deworming:

Parasite resistance to deworming products is a huge concern in sheep and goats. We recommend using fecal egg counts and the FAMACHA system to determine a deworming protocol.

  1. Check the animal’s eyelid color every 30 days.
  2. Animals with pale eyelids should have fecal exam, prior to deworming.
  3. A fecal exam can be performed 2 weeks after deworming to determine if the drug is effective.
  4. We recommend fecal testing prior to rotating pastures.
  5. We recommend fecal testing ewes/does 1 month prior to lambing/kidding.
  6. We recommend fecal testing any new animal prior to introducing it into your herd.
  7. Animals with diarrhea should be isolated on a dry lot and their feces should be submitted for an exam
  8. Young animals are susceptible to coccidiosis, particularly animals kept in close confinement. Coccidia can be diagnosed by fecal examination and we can provide prescription and over-the-counter options for treatment.

Hoof Care:

We recommend checking your animal’s hooves every thirty days to determine if the hoof wall is over grown. Also check between the hooves for raw areas or a foul smell that may indicate foot rot. Any animal found standing on its knees or limping should have its hooves examined. Unsure about trimming hooves? We will be glad to teach you at your next appointment.

Llama/Alpaca Resources:

Vaccinations:

  • Clostridial Perfringens Types C and D with Tetanus (CD/T) should be given by subcutaneous injection at 3 months of age, boostered 3-4 weeks later, then given once annually. Adult animals should receive this vaccine once annually.
  • Rabies should be given at 3 months of age, then repeated annually.

Deworming:

Llamas and alpacas are predisposed to an interesting parasite carried by White Tailed Deer. If your animals are in an area in which they are exposed to white-tail deer, once-a-month deworming with injectable Ivermectin 1% (Ivomec) or Doramectin 1% (Dectomax) is indicated for prevention during the seasons with deer exposure. These products are injected subcutaneously at 1mL per 110 pounds of body weight.

Other intestinal parasites are resistant to these dewormers. Routine fecal examinations provide guidance on worm burden and efficacy of your deworming schedule. Schedules will vary based on the density of animals on your property, grazing conditions, and the animals age and immune status.

Other:

Camelids are incredibly sensitive to heat stress. When ambient temperatures and humidity levels are high, it is important to shear these these animals and provide access to shade and/or fans.

Get In Touch

  Address: PO Box 987 Marion, NC 28752

  Phone: (828) 738-3883

  Fax: (828) 270-3213


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